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Place your bets.

David Shiffman, a shark scientist, that confirm scientific suspicions that Phelps would lose.

Our question to Shiffman: “Is this an entirely ridiculous stunt, or is there something possibly to learn here?”

Shiffman responded: “If what they're trying to teach is ‘wow, sharks are so fast that even Michael Phelps doesn't even come close,’ that's an interesting way to convey that idea.”

There’s one way — maybe — Phelps could win. You try telling a great white shark to swim in a straight line.

Each year, great white sharks that forage in waters off the central California coast migrate as much as 2,500 miles (4,000 km) over the open ocean, to other feeding grounds in the Pacific Ocean. A team of scientists investigating the tracks of four great white sharks, using data from satellite tags, have found evidence that these non-stop journeys are fueled by lipids, or fat, stored in the sharks’ large livers.

What’s the view like through the eyes of a shark? That’s what some shark researchers in Australia wanted to know. They used an instrument called a microspectrophotometer to measure light-sensitive cells in the eyes of several shark species. 

"Humans have three cone types that are sensitive to blue, green and red light, respectively, and by comparing signals from the different cone types we get the sensation of colour vision," according to Professor Hart, of the University of Western Australia who led the study.
"However, we found that sharks have only a single cone type and by conventional reckoning, this means that they don't have colour vision. It does not necessarily mean that sharks see in black and white, but they’re certainly color-blind.

great white shark feeding behaviour

Great white sharks congregate every spring in a deep area of the Pacific Ocean known as the white shark Café. Scientists are not sure what the sharks are doing while at the Café but because animals undertake extensive migrations for a number of reasons including escape, dispersal, foraging and reproduction, they cited this as a potential mating area. When the females arrive at the Café only briefly, the males were already patrolling the area in an increased rate of vertical movement.

shark called nicole

A white shark undertook the longest marine migration in the world from Gansbaai, South Africa  to Australia

Nicole—is named after Australian actress and shark- lover Nicole Kidman

This lady travelled from Gansbaai,  South Africa to Australia and back—a total of  12,400 miles (more  than 20,000 kilometers)—in nine months. The feat also set a  second record: fastest return migration  of any known marine animal.
Her travels have astounded researchers and challenge long-held notions about  these awesome  predators

....the  science you won't learn  during 'Shark Week'

When Sharks Attack Cancer -- And More Science That's Not On 'Shark Week'

Latest Blog

  • 24
    Jul '17

    Team Phleps vs Team Shark

     phleps 830x150

    Place your bets.

    David Shiffman, a shark scientist, that confirm scientific suspicions that Phelps would lose.

    Our question to Shiffman: “Is this an entirely ridiculous stunt, or is there something possibly to learn here?”

    Shiffman responded: “If what they're trying to teach is ‘wow, sharks are so fast that even Michael Phelps doesn't even come close,’ that's an interesting way to convey that idea.”

    There’s one way — maybe — Phelps could win. You try telling a great white shark to swim in a straight line.

  • 09
    Feb '17

    Travelling light: White Sharks pack their lunch in Liver Fat on long migrations

    Each year, great white sharks that forage in waters off the central California coast migrate as much as 2,500 miles (4,000 km) over the open ocean, to other feeding grounds in the Pacific Ocean. A team of scientists investigating the tracks of four great white sharks, using data from satellite tags, have found evidence that these non-stop journeys are fueled by lipids, or fat, stored in the sharks’ large livers.

  • 08
    Feb '17

    Sharks don't see red -in fact they might be color blind.

    What’s the view like through the eyes of a shark? That’s what some shark researchers in Australia wanted to know. They used an instrument called a microspectrophotometer to measure light-sensitive cells in the eyes of several shark species. 

    "Humans have three cone types that are sensitive to blue, green and red light, respectively, and by comparing signals from the different cone types we get the sensation of colour vision," according to Professor Hart, of the University of Western Australia who led the study.
    "However, we found that sharks have only a single cone type and by conventional reckoning, this means that they don't have colour vision. It does not necessarily mean that sharks see in black and white, but they’re certainly color-blind.

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