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While a great white shark’s 300 serrated teeth are an amazing hunting adaptation, what’s even more amazing is their replaceability. In a lifetime, each shark can grow up to 20,000 of them. 

shark senses gaping mouth

When this predator comes for you, you don't see the shark, you just see two-inch triangular teeth. For decades this ancient hunting machine has terrified beachgoers across the globe.

 

Seasickness is a form of motion sic­kness. It's triggered when parts of your body that detect motion, like your eyes and inner ear, send unexpected or conflicting messages to the brain. Another way to say it is that it's a reaction to real, perceived or anticipated motion.

seasick woman on boatmark twain

While the majority of our passengers usually do not experience seasickness, many of our guest’s number one fear is becoming seasick during the trip.

A boat’s movement can cause stress on your balance system which leaves you sick to your stomach, with headaches and feeling the worst you’ve felt in a while (which is why we want you to avoid seasickness on your shark cage diving tour).

Each year, great white sharks that forage in waters off the central California coast migrate as much as 2,500 miles (4,000 km) over the open ocean, to other feeding grounds in the Pacific Ocean. A team of scientists investigating the tracks of four great white sharks, using data from satellite tags, have found evidence that these non-stop journeys are fueled by lipids, or fat, stored in the sharks’ large livers.

 

What’s the view like through the eyes of a shark? That’s what some shark researchers in Australia wanted to know. They used an instrument called a microspectrophotometer to measure light-sensitive cells in the eyes of several shark species. 

"Humans have three cone types that are sensitive to blue, green and red light, respectively, and by comparing signals from the different cone types we get the sensation of colour vision," according to Professor Hart, of the University of Western Australia who led the study.
"However, we found that sharks have only a single cone type and by conventional reckoning, this means that they don't have colour vision. It does not necessarily mean that sharks see in black and white, but they’re certainly color-blind.

2017/18 BLUE FLAG STATUS AWARDED TO 62 OF SA’S TOP BEACHES, SUSTAINABLE TOURISM BOATS AND MARINAS

Says Vincent Shacks, WESSA Ecotourism Manager: “Blue Flag is an excellent example of what is achievable when the government, both local and national, partner with civil society. The programme encourages adherence to very high, international standards for beaches, boats and marinas."

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Shark Cage Diving Map

shark cage diving map2

Contact Details

No. 8 Swart Street, Kleinbaai, Gansbaai, South Africa

GPS: 34° 36'52"S - 19º 21'18"E

Phone: +27 (0) 28 384 1418

Mobile: +27 (0) 83 300 2138

E-Mail:  brian@sharkcagediving.net

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